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This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No694266)

Bookchapters

't Hart, P. & Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen (2020) Communicating and Managing Crisis in the World of Politics

Communicating and managing crisis in the world of politics written by Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen and Paul ‘t Hart for Frandsen, F. & Johansen, W., 2020, (In preparation) Crisis Communication. Frandsen, F. & Johansen, W. (eds.). 1 ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, Vol. 23. (Handbooks of Communication Science, Vol. 23).

't Hart, P. (2019) Back to the Seventies? Inaction, Power and the Quality of Government (ed)

P. 't Hart wrote 'Back to the Seventies? Inaction, Power and the Quality of Government' in the edited volume by G. de Graaf (eds) in 'It's all About Integrity, Stupid'. This book contains 26 studies on the integrity of governance, by scholars from around the world. The studies are on, about or inspired by Leo Huberts, the famous integrity scholar.

Luetjens, J., Mintrom, M., and Paul ‘t Hart (2019) On studying policy successes in Australia and New Zealand

​This chapter is the introduction of the chapters written for the Successful Public Policy: Lessons from Australia and New Zealand book. Written by Jo Luetjens, Michael Mintrom and Paul 't Hart. 

Fenna, A., and P. 't Hart (2019) The 53-billion-dollar question: Was Australia’s 2009–2010 fiscal stimulus a good thing?

This chapter is one of the chapters written for the Successful Public Policy: Lessons from Australia and New Zealand book. Written by Alan Fenna and Paul 't Hart. 

Compton, M. & 't Hart, P. (2019) Looping to Success (and Failure): Second-order Mechanisms and Policy Outcomes

Mallory Compton together with prof. Paul 't Hart wrote this chapter: 'Looping to Success (and Failure): Second-order Mechanisms and Policy Outcomes' for the forthcoming book: 'Making Policies Work: First and Second Order Mechanisms in Policy Design' edited by G. Capano, M. Howlett, and M. Ramesh. 

Compton, M. E., & Meier, K. J. (2017). Bureaucracy to Postbureaucracy: The consequences of political failures. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management.

Pathologies inherent in democratic political systems have consequences for bureaucracy, and they need to be examined. Limited in time, resources, and expertise, elected officials turn to bureaucratic institutions to carry out policy goals but all too often give public agencies too little support or too few resources to implement them effectively. In response to the challenges imposed by politics, public agencies have sought organizational solutions. Bureaucracies facing shortages of material resources, clear goals, representation of minority interests, or public trust have in recent decades adopted less hierarchical structures, exploited networks and privatization, and taken a representative role. In other words, the evolution of postbureaucratic governance institutions is in part a consequence of political incentives. Efforts to diagnose and resolve many of the shortcomings attributed to bureaucracy therefore require an accounting of the political processes shaping the context in which public managers and bureaucrats operate.

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